HP Consulting’s Standards-Driven Requirements Method at BPMCM15

Tim Price from HP’s enterprise transformation consulting group presented in the last slot of day 2 of the BPM and case management summit (and what will be my last session, since I’m not staying for the workshops tomorrow) with a discussion on how to improve requirements management by applying standards. There are a lot of potential problems with requirements: inconsistency, not meeting the actual needs, not designed for change, and especially the short-term thinking of treating requirements as project rather than architecture assets. Price is pretty up-front about how you can’t take a “garden variety” business analyst and have them create BPMN diagrams without training, and that 50% of business analysts are unable to create lasting and valuable requirements.

Although I haven’t done any quantitative studies on this, I would tend to agree that the term “business analyst” covers a wide variety of skill levels, and you can’t just assume that anyone with that title can create reusable requirements models and assets. This becomes especially important when you move past written requirements — that need the written language skills that many BAs do have — to event-driven BPMN and other models; the main issue is that these models are actually code, albeit visual code, that may be beyond the technical analysis capabilities of most BAs.

Getting back to Price’s presentation, he established traceability as key to requirements: between BPMN or UML process models and UML use cases, for example; or upwards from processes to capabilities. Data needs to be modeled at the same time as processes, and processes should be modeled as soon as the the high level use case is defined. You can’t always created a one-to-one relationship between different types of elements: an atomic BPMN activity may translate to a use case (system or human), or to more than one use cases, or to only a portion of a use case; lanes and pools may translate to use case actors, but not necessarily; events may represent states and implied state transitions, although also not necessarily. Use prose for descriptions, but not for control flow: that’s what you use process models for, with the prose just explaining the process model. Develop the use case and process models first, then write text to explain whatever is not obvious in the diagrams.

He walked through a case study of a government welfare and benefits organization that went through multiple failed implementations, which were traced back to poor requirements: structural problems, consistency issues, and designs embedded in the specification. Price and his team spent 12 months getting their analysts back on track by establishing standards for creating requirements — with a few of the analysts not making the transition — that led to CMMI recognition of their new techniques. Another case study applied BPMN process models and UML use cases for a code modernization process: basically, their SDLC was the process being improved. A third case study used BPMN to document as-is and to-be processes, then use case models with complete traceability from the to-be processes to the use cases, with UML domain class models being developed in parallel.

The lessons learned from HP’s experiences:

    • Apply existing standards consistently, including BPMN, CMMN, DMN, UML

    • Use graph-structured languages for structure and logic, and prose for description

    • Use repository-based modeling tools to allow for reusability and collaboration

    • Be concise, be precise, be consistent

    • Create requirements models that are architecture assets, not just short-term project assets

    Some good lessons for requirements analysis; although this was developed for complex more waterfall-y SDLCs, some of these can definitely be adapted for more agile implementations.

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